Studio Website Basics

Studio Website Basics

How a customer perceives your business can have an incredible impact on how you’re treated. This can impact late/missed payments or the ease of enforcing your studio policies. A well put together website will help your studio’s reputation. Let’s take a look at a scenario we all might be able to relate to. Johnny is the neighborhood kid that cuts your lawn. You’ve agreed to pay him $10 a week for his services. One week, you don’t have any cash in the house to pay him. It’s no problem, you’ll just pay him next week. After all, this is just his side business. Now, if we substitute Johnny for a local landscaping service you found online that shows up with their fleet of company decaled trucks, trailers and lawnmowers, you wouldn’t think twice about missing your payment. No cash? No problem, they accept credit cards and online payments.

In these two scenarios, the same work is being done. But, how we perceive and treat them can be drastically different. The implied legitimacy of business through a website and your branding can play a huge role in how we’re treated by our clients.

A website is a great start to conveying what you already know, “I am a music teaching professional, this is not a hobby”. Your website can set the tone for the relationships you have with your current families and future customers. Your studio website is often times a family’s first impression of ‘you’ despite not being physically present. Not having a website can say just as much.

Whether you’re actively looking for new students or have a full studio, a company website is a must. Every My Music Staff account includes a website that we host on your behalf.

Benefits of a Studio Website:

Discoverability

Customers rely heavily on the web to find a service or product they are interested in. Roughly three-out-of-five Americans preform online research about the services they are looking to purchase. If your customers are looking for music lessons online, it’s critical that you have an online presence. This is even more crucial if a competitor in your area has a website. Don’t give away your business.

Access to Information

New and existing customers have access to studio information around the clock. You are no longer limited by your schedule to answer sales calls, emails and texts. Your website is working for you at all times.

Credibility

A website is an unspoken expectation of any business. Your website will allow you to earn trust by showcasing who you are, what you offer and what your current clients think of your offerings. Even if you are not looking to accept new students, it’s important you have a studio website to further legitimize your business.

Who Visits?

You can gain a wealth of information about your customers. It’s possible to view how many unique visitors you’ve received, what pages are viewed most often, how many people took a particular action on your site, how they are finding you, etc. These valuable insights will allow you to tweak your website, studio offerings and more, to better serve your customers and/or attract more of them.

Savings

A website is a bargain when compared to other forms of advertising. Unlike other mediums, such as printed ads, you can tweak your website on the fly. The reach of your website is also much larger when compared to print ads. 

Building a website used to require a lot of specialized knowledge. Now, there are a lot of great website builders (My Music Staff, Wix, Weebly, etc.) out there that allow anyone to create a website within a day. Much like using a template in Microsoft Office, you can drag’n’drop pictures, videos and content into place with ease. Setting up a studio website is so easy these days. No more excuses, start building your studio website today!

Not sure where to start? Visit www.mymusicstaff.com to start your 30-day free trial. My Music Staff enables you to build your own studio website while also managing your students, scheduling and billing!

 

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Online Piano Lessons for the Everyday Teacher
Mario Ajero, Ph.D., NCTM
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